Glaucoma

Glaucoma

Glaucoma

Glaucoma is a group of eye diseases that damage the optic nerve. The optic nerve carries images from the retina, which is the specialized light-sensing tissue, to the brain so we can see. When a significant number of nerve fibers are damaged, blind spots develop in the field of vision causing permanent visual loss. Most people don't notice these blind areas until much of the optic nerve damage has already occurred. Glaucoma is a leading cause of blindness in the world, especially in older people. Early detection and immediate treatment is the only way to prevent optic nerve damage and vision loss from glaucoma.

The exact cause of optic nerve damage from glaucoma is not fully understood, but it involves mechanical compression and decreased blood flow of the optic nerve. Although high eye pressure sometimes leads to glaucoma, many people can also develop glaucoma with normal eye pressure.

We, at Mumbai Eye Care provide the top-class treatment with the best ophthalmologist for glaucoma.

The Different Types of Glaucoma

Open-angle glaucoma

Chronic open-angle glaucoma is the most common form of glaucoma. The ‘open’ drainage angle of the eye gets blocked leading to gradual increase in eye pressure. If this increased pressure results in optic nerve damage, it is known as chronic open-angle glaucoma. The optic nerve damage and vision loss usually occurs so gradually and painlessly that you are not aware of trouble until the optic nerve is already badly damaged.

Our doctors are well-versed and highly experienced when it comes to open angle glaucoma surgery.

Angle-closure glaucoma

Angle-closure glaucoma results when the drainage angle of the eye narrows until completely blocked. In the eye, the iris may close off the drainage angle and cause a dangerously high eye pressure. When the drainage angle of the eye suddenly becomes completely blocked, pressure builds up rapidly, and this is called acute angle-closure glaucoma. The angle closure glaucoma symptoms include severe eye pain, blurred vision, headache, rainbow haloes around lights, nausea and vomiting. This form of glaucoma occurs more frequently in people of African and Asian ancestry, and in certain eye conditions.

The Different Types of Glaucoma

FAQS

Regular eye-checkups are the best way to detect glaucoma. Your ophthalmologist will measure your eye pressure (tonometry); inspect the drainage angle of your eye (gonioscopy); evaluate your optic nerve (ophthalmoscopy); and test the visual field of each eye (perimetry). Optic nerve evaluation and visual field testing are performed at regular intervals to monitor the effects of glaucoma.
High eye pressure alone does not necessarily mean you have glaucoma, but it is an important risk factor your ophthalmologist will use to determine your risk for developing the disease.
Your ophthalmologist can prescribe treatment for glaucoma, but only you can make sure you take your eye drops or pills regularly and on time. Do not stop taking or change your medications without consulting your ophthalmologist. Frequent eye examinations and tests are critical to monitor your eyes for any changes. Remember, it is your vision, and you must do your part to maintain it.
It can be usually controlled with eye drops taken several times a day or sometimes with pills. These medications decrease eye pressure, either by slowing the production of aqueous fluid within the eye or by improving the flow leaving the drainage angle. You must take them regularly for positive results. It is important to tell your doctor about any other medications you are using. Glaucoma medications can have side effects. You should notify your ophthalmologist immediately if you think you may be experiencing side effects.